Icebergs, speedboats and oil tankers: The design behind the design of the new lostmy.name

This post was written by Nick Marsh, designer, product manager and general busybody at Lost My Name

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“It’s so easy to use, it’s like magic” - user tester when using our ‘new design’

In the past few weeks we’ve been shipping a series of very significant updates to the user experience for Lost My Name customers - you can check out the purchase journey part of this for yourself here.

Image: Our beautiful new basket page. I challenge you to find a better basket on the internet

At the time of writing it’s nearly ‘done’ in as far as the core building blocks of our future UX are now live on the site and part of the delivery team has moved onto the integration of our exciting new book while a new squad gets to work optimizing the experience.

This is a big milestone for the company, and represents the culmination of around six months technical, creative and organisational change work.

I’m writing this post to record and highlight the many projects and people that contributed to this achievement.

I hope it will be useful as reminder to all of us working in digital businesses that designing and delivering beautiful, simple, scalable user experiences is about so much more than the graphic design of the interaction layer with the customer.

Years ago, in my first proper job, my old boss and mentor Joe Heapy used to tell me “service design is an organisational problem”, and I see this more and more every day in my work.

The user interface of lostmy.name is like the tip of an iceberg - it’s the visible portion of the much deeper collection of complex technical and human delivery systems that lie below the surface. The tip is the ‘new design’ that customers now experience.

But to make that design simple, elegant and scalable means thinking and working hard on the myriad of ‘designs’ that the customer don’t see - and that most people don’t think of as design at all.

Image: Lazy screenshot for a lazy metaphor

In the immortal words of the late Prophet Steve Jobs “Most people make the mistake of thinking design is what it looks like. That’s not what we think design is. It’s not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.”

Making a system like Lost My Name ‘work’ at scale is a lot of work. As an illustration, it’s fair to say that almost everyone in the company was involved in some way in shipping this ‘new design’.

So what is the ‘new design’? Well, it’s a beautiful, consistent, performant, mobile focused shopping experience for customers. That’s the tip of the iceberg. But it also gives us several other business benefits under the surface:

  • We now have a front-end codebase and UI system ready to sell more than one product

  • We now have a content management system that makes it very easy to add new internationalised sites and products with minimal developer intervention

  • We can nowiterate and test UI changes aimed at increasing conversion rate and other metrics much, much faster

  • Our build and deploy time has decreased, making it less frustrating to ship

  • And, above all else, due to the modularisation and consistency at a UX / UI and code level we can now start separating different parts of the customer experience out more easily and handing responsibility for smaller pieces over to our new product squads.

In this post I’m going to outline the major projects that lay behind this ‘new design’. I hope this is useful for anyone in the process of wrestling with transformation in their own business.

It’s also, in part, an attempt to document this work for posterity and celebrate the hard work put in by all the team - doing all this whilst the company 6x’d headcount has been no mean feat.

The major projects were:

  • A big refactor of our store front that we called project Mermaid

  • A new design language and principle driven UX

  • A componentised front end that we called project Jester

  • A new, abstracted CMS powered by Contentful

  • An organisational transformation to take advantage of all this

These projects (or ‘designs’) are interconnected and there are many other small pieces I have missed out.

Project 1: The enabler, code name ‘Mermaid’

During the christmas quarter of 2014 we tried, and often failed, to ship a range of experimental features and tests to improve conversion rate and basket size. One of the principle reasons for this failure was our underlying mostly monolithic code base which is built on top of Spree, an open source ecommerce engine.

Developers were trying to ship simple stories like ‘allow a customer to add multiple items to a cart from a landing page’ and getting caught up in the complex business logic of the Spree core. The result was a lot of heads on keyboards and frustrated product owners.

At the end of 2014 we held our first all hands quarterly engineering retrospective. Amongst other things we agreed to re-architect Spree to move the storefront logic out of Spree all together. This would achieve the twin goals of enabling full stack developers and UI designers to ship experimental features faster, whilst core engineers could remain confident in the integrity of the central ecommerce platform. Patrick Sinclair, our head of Engineering described it as “tankers and speedboats”. Predictably, he was immediately nicknamed The Deacon.

Image: Patrick Sinclair yearbook photo

After spiking a range of options we settled on a half-way house - we’d deliver Mermaid as an app within an app, separating logic within the codebase, but not going so far as to have the storefront communicate with the backend over http as two separate services.

Image: A snapshot of our ‘All The Architecture’ diagram showing Mermaid at the heart of everything. With a Monkey on her shoulder.

During February and March of 2015 Simon Coffey and Patrick Sinclair led the effort to complete this programme of work as quickly as possible. Back end re-factors are a hard project to sell to the rest of the business as perceived progress is low so pace was important.

By mid April 2015 Mermaid went into QA and was live by the end of the month. So far so good, but from a ‘new design’ perspective … nothing had changed! Mermaid shipped with exact like for like features and UI. Very much a below the surface part of the iceberg.

But we now had a strong foundation for the application of our new UX ideas...

Project 2: New, principle driven design language

At the same away day we’d held a separate meeting about the need to ‘refactor’ our design language. We had several goals here.

First, we wanted a more flexible digital design system that allowed for easier experimentation in conjunction with the de-coupling that would happen with Mermaid.

Second, we needed toiterate our visual style to de-couple the Lost My Name brand from the Lost My Name book in advance of our new book - historically the brand, site and book have been one thing. That had to change.

Image: The Lost My Name homepage over time

Thirdly, we needed to really focus in on improving the user experience on mobiles and smaller devices. In the previous quarter our traffic had become majority mobile, and this was increasing. It’s around 70% mobile at the time of writing.

The legacy design we had in place was creative and fun, but very visually led. We had several different core layouts within a single journey, and the design was desktop first.

So we set to work to evolve the design language, in parallel with a significant change to how we handled our front end code base (the next project, below). This work was led by Simon Cook our creative director, with significant input from Lee Giles and myself (Nick Marsh).

The end result is our ‘new design’. Behind this design lie two big themes - consistency and modularity.

First, consistency. With our new design we’ve tried to make sure that the user experiences a consistent approach to creating and editing our personalised products throughout all parts of their journey. Previously we had four different ways to edit the customisation options of their books.

Image: UX audit of the legacy design showing three different templates in three consecutive steps

Now, on the landing page, preview page, basket page and in their account area users see the same interface components and rich, full screen preview.

We’ve also pushed consistency into other parts of the experience - for example using the same grids throughout, consistent call to action colours and buttons as well as other small principles such as containing key interactive areas inside drop-shadowed cards with a red highlight.

Image: Some of our components

The second big theme is modularity. We’ve broken all the design components down into small individual parts, and made those parts work elegantly at all screen sizes (optimised best for mobile) and on any page.

Image: Example responsive ‘card’ components for display any combination of icon, header and paragraph text

This gives us much more flexibility in terms of iterating on the design and experimenting with different layouts and content within components. It also is the foundation for our next big iteration when we’ll introduce our next book - it will look gorgeous and unique, whilst feeling familiar and re-using very similar modules and layouts. But we can’t show you that quite yet!

The end result is a foundation for growth in the variety of user experiences we can provide and the range of tests we can run. It is also hopefully a framework that will make bringing new designers on board easier and quicker. This project is the tip of the iceberg - although the ‘design’ you don’t see is the vast array of future designs and iterations made possible by a principle driven design system.

We still have to fully document the system, but once we do I’ll write about it in more detail.

Project 3. A componentised front end

This project, code named Jester, is the implementation layer of the previous project and was led by Barney Fox, our head of interface development.

The principles behind Jester are those of the new design language - consistency and modularity, but they add another - re-use.

All our interface components are now delivered as smart partials of code that can be easily reused, updated in one place and then we see the change propagate to all instances.

We also refactored the asset pipeline as part of Jester (code named project Pigeon) to improve how we handle image compression and storage (we also removed a lot of images from the build with the next project below).

Finally, we’ve introduced a smart theming system whereby we can apply a different theme to the same component. This is the technical expression of the change to the design language mentioned above whereby we needed to start differentiating between Lost My Name the brand, Lost My Name the book and our new product.

Jester is paying off in spades now with our current major project to add our new product to the site - it’s been a breeze to build a new product creation flow.

Project 4. A new, heavily abstracted CMS

The final technical piece to the puzzle has been the introduction of a heavily abstracted CMS to make the internationalisation of our sites easy peasy, and allow us to do content experiments more easily.

International sales are essential to Lost My Name. We’re a UK business but the vast majority of our sales come from outside the UK, and we currently have our site and book translated into seven languages - this will be ten by the end of 2015.

Prior to our CMS, managing our international sites was hard. To take one example, it meant our deploys took forever. We had to upload internationalized versions of all photos in every build - non trivial when you have a gallery of 30 images times seven languages that needs to be re-sized into four image sizes. That’s 840 images in the build. Not good!

On the text side, we had been using a clever crowd-sourced translation system that took our YML file and translated it into the right languages. This was ok, but it meant we had some weird situations - for example all our customer reviews on the French site we just translations of UK customer reviews.

So along with our new modular design language and front end we also ripped out every possible piece of content that needed more than a crowd-sourced translation and put it into a clever content management tool called Contentful. This project was led by Jesse Zwaan and Pete Roome, two of our smartest full stack developers.

Image: The Contentful UI

Contentful is essentially a CMS as an API. You add your content using a standard CMS UI, but then developers can easily query the database and request any combinations of that content in very abstract form, and then pipe into into whatever content containers you want - for example, our very modular front end!

The end result is that all its now almost trivial to ship an international site (and edit the content on it) and our build and deploy time has gone down significantly.

Again, this is a classic below the surface ‘design’ - customers don’t notice it explicitly, but it contributes to a more personal experience and has made our business more efficient and able to change faster. This leads nicely onto the biggest project of all - the ongoing organisational design work we’ve been doing to enable our growing team to take advantage of all this flexibility and modularity.

Project 5. An organisational system - squads - to support this

This deserves, and will hopefully get, a whole post in itself and is 100% a below the surface ‘design’ we’ve been working on. During this extensive rebuild we’ve also been re-factoring the organisational structure of Lost My Name to make us more agile and more focused. Our big (small) idea is ‘squads’ - small autonomous teams that have a clear mission, a single KPI to focus on and the ability to ship change without asking anyone outside their squad for help.

Image: Slide from an internal presentation on our ‘squad’ system

So whilst we were rebuilding our site and systems, we also rebuilt our teams, chopping the website team into ops, growth and product, and then further devolving into Lost My Name Book, Purchase Journey, Loyalty, Infrastructure and Performance, Product Delivery and many more.

This has been possible, in part, because of the modular, consistent technical and design systems we’ve put in place.

For example, the ‘Purchase Journey’ squad can now confidently experiment with new content in the gallery or layouts on the basket page knowing their designs won’t conflict with the ‘Lost My Name Book’ squad’s changes to the product preview, and they can all rest happy in knowing that their changes will only lightly impact the Infrastructure squad because the storefront is de-coupled from the Spree core… and so on.

Conclusion: Design is a big word

The main driver behind all of this of course has been Lost My Name’s transition from a brilliant personal project to a high growth, VC backed international business. I think the biggest achievement is that we’ve achieved these relatively complex projects as a very new team, working together for the first time, constantly onboarding new team members throughout, and considering the bigger picture of the design behind the design. This is something to be proud of I think. It’s been an epic personal journey for myself and I’m sure for other people on the team as we’ve gone from 10 to 60 employees over the past nine months - and we’re just getting started. I can’t wait to see the impact of our new product this summer.The biggest legacy from this work to systemise, separate and modularise is the technical and creative platform that will (I hope) allow our squads system to flourish and help us scale another 10x whilst staying agile and focused.

However, it’s not true to suggest a one way relationship here. I’m a big believer in Conway’s Law which states that “Organisations which design systems ... are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organisations”. I guess its the ‘law’ version,, or the output of, Joe’s observation that “service design is an organisational design problem”.

I hope that a big part of why we’ve now got the beginnings of a modular, flexible iceberg of systems (to stretch a metaphor) is because we’re genuinely building an organisation that empowers the smart creative people in it to make their own decisions, master their domain and get on with shipping and learning every day.

Time will tell. But we’re off to a good start!

P.S - If you’d like to come and help out with all this, we’re hiring across the whole stack and are especially looking for people who care about the design behind the design

Join us!

If you’d like to come and work, play and hang out with us, here’s what we’re looking for. Though you could just send us something phenomenal, leaving us with no choice but to follow up, to:

careers@lostmy.name

Front End Engineer

At Lost My Name, we're making the most technically ambitious physical books ever invented. We’re making storybooks magical for a new generation by creating impossible stories on a timeless medium, like a story that is created entirely out of a child’s name or making a book with NASA images and the world's first book that shows your own neighbourhood, your own street, your own house(!) in a book made especially for you. Oh, and speaking of NASA, we’d like to take this opportunity to brag that Tim Peake read Our Incredible Intergalactic Journey Home in actual space.

We write, illustrate, build, design, and sell all of our products directly, and have a team working to produce our wonderful products spanning from Art Directors to Dev Ops. We have sold more than 2.5 million books, games and posters in over 200 countries, and we’re just getting started! With the work you’ll do here with us, we’d like to think we’re on track towards becoming the UK’s most admired creative company.

Our products are becoming ever more personalised, feature rich and technically complex. We need a talented, front end engineer to help us build the most magical book shop in the world.

You’ll be a key hire within our Shop dev team, working alongside other engineers, designers and producers to make kids smile and our products pop. You’ll be engineering for scale our global business demands while caring about the little details.

Engineering at Lost My Name

At Lost My Name we take our engineering seriously. We empower teams to make their own decisions and choose the best tools for the job. There is no mandated stack and while we work together to make smart decisions, we prefer creativity over conformity. Each team supports their stack end-to-end, from design to scale to uptime. We make sure each system has clear contracts with no hand-offs.

As for technology we choose tooling suitable for the domain. For example we build our website using Nodejs & React. We create declarative, functional components that are reused across the site. Our ecommerce system is built using the open source Solidus project, written in Ruby. We actively contribute open source code, especially in Solidus (we employ developers who are on the core team). Our product rendering is an exciting and complex mixture of tooling and languages, reflecting the demands of our complex products, pushing the modern web stack into publishing tech.

Together we form a talented team of individuals mixing gender, experience and domain expertise. We believe the best engineers never stop learning so we have a training/conference budget, make time to improve our stack outside of product roadmap demands, host internal Lunch & Learn sessions and sync disciplines across teams.

What you'll be doing

  • Collaborate with engineers, designers and products to deliver new features and experiences for our website
  • Contribute to the design and architecture of our ecommerce stack
  • Identify and deliver improvements to speed, quality and efficiency - be that in page rendering, build improvements, more specs or more efficient hosting
  • Working with tech including Node.js, React and Redux
  • Work with our BI team to get the data you need to deliver improvements to conversion, speed, quality and efficiency - be that in page rendering, build improvements or A/B tests
  • Build for ever increasing numbers of users, products and transactions

A bit about you

  • You have a love for beautifully crafted products that delight people
  • Great Javascript development experience with emphasis on universal code
  • A deep understanding and thirst for ever more knowledge of the modern web stack
  • Have a desire to learn and contribute to all our stacks
  • Enjoy pairing with other engineers, contributing to joint design sessions and reviewing your peers work
  • Always thinking of new directions and improvements we can take based on data, and be able to articulate your ideas to the team

Why join Lost My Name?

  • You’ll get a sweet, SWEET training budget. £1k to attend whichever conference or training you’d like, wherever you like. Or you could learn some Spanish in Dalston, it's your call
  • We offer Yoga class every Monday night; just one of the many ways we keep centred and calm, despite the (occasional) chaos of startup life
  • We also have massages if yoga isn’t your thing, for everyone who wants one on Fridays. If you like neither yoga, nor massages (hey, they aren’t for everyone) we also offer mental health support through Sanctus, where you can speak to a wellness coach about how you’re doing
  • We have an office Sauna
  • We also provide a private healthcare plan, a pension plan and childcare vouchers (according to your plans) to show you we care
  • We have heaps of snacks. Like, so many snacks. And you can always suggest your favourite new ones to be added to our shopping trolley
  • Speaking of food: Team lunches. We nearly forgot team lunches. Every Thursday our Studio Manager, Shim, orders some super delish food from somewhere in London and we gorge ourselves. It sounds intense, but it's actually quite chill
  • Our office is full of puppies.

Midweight Digital Designer

At Lost My Name, we're making the most technically ambitious physical books ever invented. We’re making storybooks magical for a new generation by creating impossible stories on a timeless medium, like a story that is created entirely out of a child’s name or making a book with NASA images and the world's first book that shows your own neighbourhood, your own street, your own house(!) in a book made especially for you. Oh, and speaking of NASA, we’d like to take this opportunity to brag that Tim Peake read Our Incredible Intergalactic Journey Home in actual space.

We write, illustrate, build, design, and sell all of our products directly, and have a team working to produce our wonderful products spanning from Art Directors to Dev Ops. We have sold more than 2.5 million books, games and posters in over 200 countries, and we’re just getting started! With the work you’ll do here with us, we’d like to think we’re on track towards becoming the UK’s most admired creative company.

About you

  • 4+ years experience, some of which will have come from having worked at a reputable design, advertising or communications agency
  • You should be comfortable in using data to solve problems and delivering against commercial objectives
  • Confident in implementing design systems
  • Competent in Sketch, Adobe suite, Marvel, Invision
  • You have worked closely with brands
  • Be comfortable presenting, and being challenged.
  • You are optimistic, proactive and open to change
  • You can deliver and are decisive
  • You’ll have a natural urge to explore bigger and better ways to visually communicate
  • You will be able to demonstrate a understanding of UX challenges
  • If you have experience in designing responsive sites for well-known brands then awesome!

About the role

  • You will be taking briefs and transforming them into intuitive, accessible, and beautiful designs that emotionally connect with our customers.
  • Working with the team and stakeholders across the business to deliver these design solutions
  • Owning the end-to-end design process for any project you work on (with support from the Digital Design Director)
  • Supporting internal teams to shape requirements
  • Iterating through design concepts quickly with appropriate feedback from colleagues
  • Testing designs using a range of techniques
  • Initiating smaller projects

Why join Lost My Name?

  • You’ll get a sweet, SWEET training budget. £1k to attend whichever conference or training you’d like, wherever you like. Or you could learn some Spanish in Dalston, it's your call.
  • We offer Yoga class every Monday night; just one of the many ways we keep centred and calm, despite the (occasional) chaos of startup life.
  • We also have massages if yoga isn’t your thing, for everyone who wants one on Fridays. If you like neither yoga, nor massages (hey, they aren’t for everyone) we also offer mental health support through Sanctus, where you can speak to a wellness coach about how you’re doing.
  • We have an office Sauna.
  • We also provide a private healthcare plan, a pension plan and childcare vouchers (according to your plans) to show you we care.
  • We have heaps of snacks. Like, so many snacks. And you can always suggest your favourite new ones to be added to our shopping trolley.
  • Speaking of food: Team lunches. We nearly forgot team lunches. Every Thursday our Studio Manager, Shim, orders some super delish food from somewhere in London and we gorge ourselves. It sounds intense, but it's actually quite chill.
  • Our office is full of puppies.

Lead Designer

At Lost My Name, we're making the most technically ambitious physical books ever invented. We’re making storybooks magical for a new generation by creating impossible stories on a timeless medium, like a story that is created entirely out of a child’s name or making a book with NASA images and the world's first book that shows your own neighbourhood, your own street, your own house in a book made especially for you. Oh, and speaking of NASA, we’d like to take this opportunity to brag that Tim Peake read Our Incredible Intergalactic Journey Home in actual space.

We write, illustrate, build, design, and sell all of our products directly, and have a team working to produce our wonderful products spanning from Art Directors to Dev Ops. We have sold more than 2.5 million books, games and posters in over 200 countries, and we’re just getting started! With the work you’ll do here with us, we’d like to think we’re on track towards becoming the UK’s most admired creative company.

As our Lead Designer, you will be responsible for directing a talented team of graphic designers, artworkers, and photographers. Your team will be responsible for producing creative work for a variety of business partners, from marketing to product development. The work will consist of design and advertising work, from print collateral and digital advertising to fully-integrated campaigns.

Alongside the Creative Director, you’ll be leading the charge in continually raising the creative standards of the team. You’ll drive conceptual thinking and push beautiful design executions, whilst always delivering against commercial objectives.

You’ll be inspired and be inspiring – having a real passion for all things creative. You’ll have a natural urge to explore bigger and better ways to visually communicate. And your time management skills, coupled with general organisational skills, will be the envy of all those around you. You’ll be client-facing and comfortable presenting up to senior management.

In this role, you will report to the Creative Director and will work out of our bright & beautiful studio in Hackney.

What you'll be doing

  • With the CD, lead a team of creatives across multiple disciplines including graphic design, photography, artworking and animation.
  • Oversee the design and production of design across multiple platforms – print, digital, video and animation.
  • Responsible for working with internal clients and stakeholders across multiple regions, ensuring work is on brief.
  • Use a good awareness of design processes to question and challenge design briefs and solve design problems.
  • Promote strategic thinking and commercial awareness.
  • Be aware of current design trends and attitudes to help inspire the team.
  • Work closely with the CD to promote ‘big concept’ thinking.
  • Support Studio Management to assess and assign the right people to projects.

A bit about you

  • 10+ years industry experience - some of which will have come from having worked at a reputable design, advertising or communications agency. We are looking for someone with rounded experience across all communication disciplines.
  • Demonstrable experience working across a broad range of disciplines – print, digital, video and animation.
  • Have worked on integrated marketing / advertising campaigns.
  • Mentoring, nurturing, inspiring and motivating others will come naturally to you.
  • Exceptional time management.
  • Meticulous crafting and attention to detail.
  • Excellent communication and presentation skills.
  • Dedicated and passionate about design, ready to challenge the status quo with a view of evolving creative output.
  • Recognised design degree.

Finally, over the course of many years, you’ll have developed a portfolio of conceptually strong and beautiful work that clearly demonstrates how your work answers commercial briefs across many disciplines – spanning both print and digital.

Why join Lost My Name

  • You’ll get a sweet, SWEET training budget. £1k to attend whichever conference or training you’d like, wherever you like. Or you could learn some Spanish in Dalston, it's your call.
  • We offer Yoga class every Monday night; just one of the many ways we keep centred and calm, despite the (occasional) chaos of startup life.
  • We also have massages if yoga isn’t your thing, for everyone who wants one on Fridays. If you like neither yoga, nor massages (hey, they aren’t for everyone) we also offer mental health support through Sanctus, where you can speak to a wellness coach about how you’re doing.
  • We have an office Sauna.
  • We also provide a private healthcare plan, a pension plan and childcare vouchers (according to your plans) to show you we care.
  • We have heaps of snacks. Like, so many snacks. And you can always suggest your favourite new ones to be added to our shopping trolley.
  • Speaking of food: Team lunches. We nearly forgot team lunches. Every Thursday our Studio Manager, Shim, orders some super delish food from somewhere in London and we gorge ourselves. It sounds intense, but it's actually quite chill.
  • Our office is full of puppies.

Lead Copywriter

At Lost My Name, we're making the most technically ambitious physical books ever invented. We’re making storybooks magical for a new generation by creating impossible stories on a timeless medium, like a story that is created entirely out of a child’s name or making a book with NASA images and the world's first book that shows your own neighbourhood, your own street, your own house(!) in a book made especially for you. Oh, and speaking of NASA, we’d like to take this opportunity to brag that Tim Peake read Our Incredible Intergalactic Journey Home in actual space.

We write, illustrate, build, design, and sell all of our products directly, and have a team working to produce our wonderful products spanning from Art Directors to Dev Ops. We have sold more than 2.5 million books, games and posters in over 200 countries, and we’re just getting started! With the work you’ll do here with us, we’d like to think we’re on track towards becoming the UK’s most admired creative company.

We’re looking for our future Lead Copywriter at Lost My Name. Yes, this is marvellously exciting.

This person will write or oversee all (italics!) of the most commercially important words for the entire company (ads, emails, TV scripts, website copy, lunchtime sonnets and so on). They’ll also mentor another writer. Maybe more than one other in the future. And that’s not all. They will be the greatest champion of our tone of voice, and an advocate for the ‘right way to do things’ ensuring that our messaging strategy and approach is correct for each brief.

Basically, when it comes to words (except the ones in our books of course) you will be our head-human. You’ll be a wordsmith, a leader, a poet (sort of) and a marketeer. You’ll also, of course, be very experienced at all of the above.

Right then…

We are a playful, kind brand. This opportunity will be ridiculously exciting to a smart, funny, eloquent, engaging, intelligent, autonomous, experienced, creative and all-round superb candidate. This role is the Lead Copywriter in the team with a senior copywriter that will be a direct report to you. You will therefore play a central role in shaping the tone of the brand, both internally and externally. You will be involved in comms strategy, UX flows, above the line advertising, and editorial content. You’ll have to be a brand ambassador at the same time as being performance-driven.

What you'll be doing

  • Lead and write TV and product video scripts for new product launches
  • Write copy for product landing pages and order flows, demonstrating SEO and brand consideration
  • Oversee all copy across web, email and owned media for product launches
  • Create, curate and manage published content across social channels
  • Promote best practices for developing, managing and monitoring content for social networks
  • Write brand-building articles (thought leadership, point of view, white paper)
  • Collaborate with designers to devise and develop creative editorial concepts
  • Create playful pieces of content to support craft ideas for parents
  • Be the ambassador for our tone of voice across the business, including maintaining the tone of voice documents and working with freelancers to help coach them
  • Be responsible for all editorial sign-off and be the brand guardian for Tone of Voice to ensure high standards are maintained across all copy produced
  • Ensure all content is relevant and engaging for our audiences driving high levels of shareability and conversation - and of course hitting our ambitious conversion targets
  • Participate in performance analysis and help to shape the content strategy
  • Help support multi-channel campaign/comms strategy and concepts that delivers measurable results and growth
  • Work closely to inspire and mentor senior copywriter and a team of translators

A bit about you

  • 10+ years’ experience as a copywriter
  • 5+ years of experience with SEO, email, web copy
  • Ability to provide examples of playful and humorous copy in their portfolio
  • Ability to demonstrate strong copywriting skills across the full spectrum of channels (digital, print, social, OOH, press, experiential) and the ability to adopt a required tone of voice
  • An understanding of how to create, structure and integrate product strategies across multiple channels
  • Provide positive contributions to the creative process to ensure content is optimised for traffic and conversions across both on and offline channels
  • Understand how to develop talent and instil best practice into the team on an ongoing basis
  • Anything (including side projects) which demonstrates the ability to be hilarious. Jokes, memes etc. Humour is a key tool to disarm and delight people
  • Extensive experience and understanding of all social channels, including behaviours and algorithms
  • Experience writing copy for well-known and/or playful/entertaining consumer-facing brands

Why join Lost My Name

  • You’ll get a sweet, SWEET training budget. £1k to attend whichever conference or training you’d like, wherever you like. Or you could learn some Spanish in Dalston, it's your call.
  • We offer Yoga class every Monday night; just one of the many ways we keep centred and calm, despite the (occasional) chaos of startup life.
  • We also have massages if yoga isn’t your thing, for everyone who wants one on Fridays. If you like neither yoga, nor massages (hey, they aren’t for everyone) we also offer mental health support through Sanctus, where you can speak to a wellness coach about how you’re doing.
  • We have an office Sauna.
  • We also provide a private healthcare plan, a pension plan and childcare vouchers (according to your plans) to show you we care.
  • We have heaps of snacks. Like, so many snacks. And you can always suggest your favourite new ones to be added to our shopping trolley.
  • Speaking of food: Team lunches. We nearly forgot team lunches. Every Thursday our Studio Manager, Shim, orders some super delish food from somewhere in London and we gorge ourselves. It sounds intense, but it's actually quite chill.
  • Our office is full of puppies.

Digital Marketing Graduate (PPC)

At Lost My Name, we're making the most technically ambitious physical books ever invented. We’re making storybooks magical for a new generation by creating impossible stories on a timeless medium, like a story that is created entirely out of a child’s name or making a book with NASA images and the world's first book that shows your own neighbourhood, your own street, your own house(!) in a book made especially for you. Oh, and speaking of NASA, we’d like to take this opportunity to brag that Tim Peake read Our Incredible Intergalactic Journey Home in actual space.

We think-up, write, illustrate, build, design, and sell all of our products directly, and have a team working to produce our wonderful products spanning from Art Directors to Dev Ops. We have sold more than 2.5 million books, games and posters in over 200 countries, and we’re just getting started! With the work you’ll do here with us, we’d like to think we’re on track towards becoming the UK’s most admired creative company.

We’re looking for a enthusiastic and detail orientated person to join the performance marketing team at one of the UK’s most exciting startups. The role offers the opportunity to work on growing an advertising channel that has significant impact on the business, and presents a huge opportunity for the person up to the task.

We’re looking for the kind of person who is comfortable managing their own time, able to effectively prioritise work, and recognise problems and opportunities to seek support as necessary.

Full time digital marketing experience isn’t 100% necessary, but we have a few key requirements. Strong written and verbal communication skills are a requisite, as well as confidence in dealing with people at a range of different levels. You’re going to be optimising campaigns based on data; so being comfortable with complicated numeracy and spreadsheetery is a must. If you’re familiar with code based languages like HTML and SQL it should really help you get into the groove. It doesn’t hurt to have some pre-existing knowledge of how digital marketing for e-commerce works too.

To underline the above, we’re looking for somebody with proven credentials in the world of work or with a strong academic background (remember, geek is good!), and therefore expect candidates to have a 2:1 degree or similar/better.

We’ve sold millions of products to children all over the world, and this reflects in our campaign coverage. If you have a knack for languages or know a second language in it’s entirety (except perhaps Latin or Klingon), it’s a HUGE plus.

What you'll be doing

  • Day to day bid and campaign optimisation of our Bing and Adwords campaigns
  • Keyword research, ad copywriting & performance tests
  • Work closely with our BI team to drive weekly reporting & analysis of campaign performance against company KPIs
  • Data driven tests of acquisition and retention campaigns using existing customer data
  • You’ll also be part of the on-boarding and company wide education of some incredible new ad tech which will provide invaluable experience.

Why join Lost My Name

  • You’ll get a sweet, SWEET training budget. £1k to attend whichever conference or training you’d like, wherever you like. Or you could learn some Spanish in Dalston, it's your call.
  • We offer Yoga class every Monday night; just one of the many ways we keep centred and calm, despite the (occasional) chaos of startup life.
  • We also have massages if yoga isn’t your thing, for everyone who wants one on Fridays. If you like neither yoga, nor massages (hey, they aren’t for everyone) we also offer mental health support through Sanctus, where you can speak to a wellness coach about how you’re doing.
  • We have an office Sauna.
  • We also provide a private healthcare plan, a pension plan and childcare vouchers (according to your plans) to show you we care.
  • We have heaps of snacks. Like, so many snacks. And you can always suggest your favourite new ones to be added to our shopping trolley.
  • Speaking of food: Team lunches. We nearly forgot team lunches. Every Thursday our Studio Manager, Shim, orders some super delish food from somewhere in London and we gorge ourselves. It sounds intense, but it's actually quite chill.
  • Our office is full of puppies.

Recruiter/Sourcer

At Lost My Name, we're making the most technically ambitious physical books ever invented. We’re making storybooks magical for a new generation by creating impossible stories on a timeless medium, like a story that is created entirely out of a child’s name or making a book with NASA images and the world's first book that shows your own neighbourhood, your own street, your own house(!) in a book made especially for you. Oh, and speaking of NASA, we’d like to take this opportunity to brag that Tim Peake read Our Incredible Intergalactic Journey Home in actual space.

We think-up, write, illustrate, build, design, and sell all of our products directly, and have a team working to produce our wonderful products spanning from Art Directors to Dev Ops. We have sold more than 2.5 million books, games and posters in over 200 countries, and we’re just getting started! With the work you’ll do here with us, we’d like to think we’re on track towards becoming the UK’s most admired creative company.

We’re looking for a Recruiter/Sourcer to join our People & Talent team. This is a role that focuses primarily on the beginning of the hiring process, from understanding the requirements to highlighting and executing sourcing strategies, and engaging with talent in the market. You’ll track your sourcing and recruitment activity and manage your recruitment pipeline diligently. As a team we'll encourage all of our work to be data driven, so we're hoping our ideal new teammate will use the recruitment pipeline, and ATS reporting as an indicator on how to improve your sourcing techniques.

About you

  • Previous experience sourcing a wide variety of candidate pools, either in-house or at an agency
  • Experience maintaining an ATS, ideally Lever
  • Able to showcase sourcing techniques and best practices
  • Interview skills with a keen ability to screen for both technical and cultural qualities
  • Excellent communication skills, both written and verbal

What will you do?

  • Taking briefs from both hiring lead and Head of People & Talent
  • Planning and executing outreach strategies including sourcing, attending events and referral generation
  • Interview scheduling
  • Interview telephone screening
  • Communicating with candidates throughout the hiring process, and on our inbound channels
  • Lever maintenance and management, including responsibility for reporting

Why join Lost My Name

  • You’ll get a sweet, SWEET training budget. £1k to attend whichever conference or training you’d like, wherever you like. Or you could learn some Spanish in Dalston, it's your call.
  • We offer Yoga class every Monday night; just one of the many ways we keep centred and calm, despite the (occasional) chaos of startup life.
  • We also have massages if yoga isn’t your thing, for everyone who wants one on Fridays. If you like neither yoga, nor massages (hey, they aren’t for everyone) we also offer mental health support through Sanctus, where you can speak to a wellness coach about how you’re doing.
  • We have an office Sauna.
  • We also provide a private healthcare plan, a pension plan and childcare vouchers (according to your plans) to show you we care.
  • We have heaps of snacks. Like, so many snacks. And you can always suggest your favourite new ones to be added to our shopping trolley.
  • Speaking of food: Team lunches. We nearly forgot team lunches. Every Thursday our Studio Manager, Shim, orders some super delish food from somewhere in London and we gorge ourselves. It sounds intense, but it's actually quite chill.
  • Our office is full of puppies.
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